This SlideShowPro photo gallery requires the Flash Player plugin and a web browser with JavaScript enabled.

Corvette Values

Decoding a Corvette’s V8 Casting Numbers and Engine Stamps

by Keith Cornett on December 11, 2007

Back in September I wrote about how documentation was the must-have option when buying a classic Corvette. That article focused on mostly the paper trail: dealer invoices, build sheets and tank stickers. Today the focus is on the engine and the clues available for verifying authenticity. While the term “Matching Numbers” in its simplist form is various serial numbers and codes located on key parts and their relationship to a particular year of Corvette, it’s the engine block that is the most important part of the matching numbers equation. Unfortunately, as Corvette values rise, so do your chances of buying a Corvette with altered numbers being passed off as an original. As my favorite mantra goes when purchasing a Corvette, knowledge is power, and the more you can learn about documenting a Corvette prior to purchase, the less likely you will get burned with buying a Corvette of questionable lineage.

A series of codes and stamps are located on the engine block that will allow you to identify it as being manufactured specifically for a Corvette. There are dates of manufacture and the engine’s original application if you just know where to look. As the year’s progressed and engine options increased, the numbering and casting system obviously changed and became more specific. For the examples provided, I will be referring to the 327 ci 300 hp small block V8 in my 1966 Corvette.

Chevrolet Smallblock V8 Casting number and engine stamping locations 1966 Corvette 327 ci V8 Engine Casting Number 1966 Corvette 327 ci V8 Engine Stamp

Casting Numbers
The casting number is a sequence consisting of raised numbers that was cast into the engine block when it was made. What’s a bit tricky here is that casting numbers on Corvette blocks can also be found on other engine blocks made by GM. Casting Numbers are important to the engine documentation process because certain numbers were used for Corvettes and some were not. Also, the numbers are specific to the size of engine in the Corvette. 283′s, 327′s and 427′s all had their own casting numbers specific to individual years, so for the process of documenting a Corvette engine, the casting number will be used to confirm that that block was used in a Corvette and that it was available during the same year the Corvette was manufactured, and finally, it was unique to a specific engine size. The casting number on Chevy V8′s is located on the drivers side of the engine where the block is connected to the bellhousing. It can be a bit hard to see with the ignition shielding in place but the numbers are fairly large. The casting number on my 1966 is 3858174 which is identified as a 327 ci V8 block. That block casting number was also used in 1964-67 passenger cars including the Chevelle and Camaro as well as Chevrolet trucks.

Casting Dates
The cast date symbolizes the date of manufacture of the block. Dates are coded beginning with a letter representing the month. Letters began with “A” for January through “L” for December. The next section of digits represents the day of the month and is either 1 or 2 digits in length. The final single digit represents the year. Corvette casting dates only show the single digit for the year. If the block contains two digits for the year, then it was a block manufactured at the Tonawanda engine plant and therefore is not a Corvette block (Corvette engines were almost exclusively built in Flint, Michigan). Cast dates on small block V8′s can be found on the passenger side of flange where the block is connected to the bellhousing. I found this number difficult to locate. On 1965-67 big blocks, the cast date is located on the passenger side of the block where the starter is attached. The cast date on the block in my 1966 is “E 5 6″, which decoded stands for May 5, 1966. If you are trying to document an engine, the casting number would confirm the size of the engine and its intended recipient, and the date code would confirm that the block was used in Corvettes.

Engine Stamping
Engine stampings evolved in the early years of the Chevrolet V8 engine. In 1955-56, it was simply a continuous serial number, but one that didn’t match the serial number of the Corvette. It was then followed with F for Flint, where the Corvette engine was manufactured and then the year (F55 or F56). The final two letters indicated the original application of the engine. Application Codes usually indicated engine size, type of fuel delivery (Injection or carburetion) and transmission. As engine options grew, so did the number of application suffix codes. In 1957, the serial number was dropped and instead the stamp contained the letter F for Flint, a three to four number sequence for month and day of assembly and then the two letter engine suffix code. Beginning in 1960 the stamp included the serial number of the car it was installed in. The 327 engine in my Corvette contains the following number sequences: 6122891 F0518HE. Decoded, the first sequence is 6 for the year (66) and then the VIN sequence of 122891. The second stamp decodes F for the Flint Plant, May 18 is the engine assembly date and the HE suffix code stands for a 327 ci 300 hp with a manual transmission.

So there you have the basics of decoding engine numbers for the purpose of documentation. Please note that there are some exceptions to the information contained above. In 1965 it is said that there was a shortage of 327 blocks from the Flint plant, so Chevrolet used some engine blocks from Tonawanda. Those engines would have a T instead of F on the stamp, as well as the full year in the cast date. There are several publications that contain a breakdown of engine codes and sequences. The NCRS also provides a publication that details how engines were stamped and therefore, may help you identify restamped engines.

Related:
The Must-Have Option When Buying A Classic Corvette
Five Factors That Drive Corvette Values – Options

 

ProTeam Corvette to Host NCRS Technical Seminar

by Keith Cornett on October 30, 2007

The Protect-O-Plate from my 1966 CorvetteThis coming Saturday, November 3rd, ProTeam Corvette will host NCRS members from four states for a day-long seminar on trim tags, Protect-O-Plates, documentation and the decoding of these items. As documentation plays an important role in pricing and valuations, the morning seminars will focus on what ProTeam calls Chevrolet’s predictable measure of each car and the missteps and omissions that occurred along the way. An afternoon seminar is also planned that will address the cylinder case and its perceived importance on originality. The hands-on session will center on the every day exceptions, aberrations, corrections, errors, do-overs, misapplications, and general conundrums associated with factory production. NCRS Master Judge Al Grenning will be the instructor for the day-long event. Grenning is a Senior Bloomington Gold Restoration Workshop Instructor, Division Director for Numbers and Tags – Bloomington Gold Certification as well as being a member of the National Corvette Certification Board & National Corvette Survivor Board. His research includes: the “Master Pad Library” containing many thousands of Corvette engine pad photographs and co-authorship of the “NCRS Authentication Library, Vol. 1″, the result of extensive research on 1963 to 1967 midyear trim tags. Additional research includes midyear Protect-O-Plates, trim tags and a large comprehensive photocopy library of St. Louis Corvette production documents. The seminar will serve to spread the Corvette gospel through education about the cryptic history and factory anomalies of America ‘s true sports car. Any questions about this and future seminars, contact Terry Michaelis at ProTeam Corvette.
Source:
ProTeam Corvette Related:
The Must-Have Option When Buying A Classic Corvette Technorati Tags:
| | | |

Corvette Poker: Trumping an Automatic Big Block

by Keith Cornett on July 31, 2007

I took a call today from Robert in Wisconsin who had some questions about early 1970′s Corvettes. His question was should he sell his 1972 Corvette Coupe with a 454 ci engine and an automatic transmission for a 1971 Corvette Convertible with a 350 ci engine and a 4-speed. Like many classic Corvette owners, he was torn between the big block power of the 1972 and the convertible/4-speed combo in the 1971. He wanted a convertible, loved the idea of a 4-speed, but thought he’d miss the power of the big block 454 engine. But in his reasoning, it always came back to what was the more valuable car, so Robert’s major concern was holding the right Corvette from an investment standpoint. Let’s look at the 1972 Corvette by the numbers. Robert had a T-Top Coupe with an automatic and the 454 ci 270 hp engine. 20,496 Corvette T-Top Coupes were produced in 1972, which accounted for 75% of Corvette production. The LS5 454 was chosen by 3,913 buyers, and had an option penetration of 14%. The horsepower ratings were lowered in 1972 from gross to net, which makes the horsepower output a more realistic “real-world” rating. A/C was an option chosen by 63% of buyers and the automatic transmission was chosen by 54% of buyers. Our Corvette Price Guide places an average 1972 T-Top Coupe at $18,900. We add $6,000 for the 454 and $3,000 for the factory air conditioning, so our average 1972 is now valued at $27,900.

1971 Corvette Convertible 1972 Corvette Coupe
A labor strike shortened production of the 1971 Corvette. Only 21,801 Corvettes were produced, with 33% being Convertibles. 67% of all Corvettes featured the base engine, a 350 ci 270 hp power plant, and the base 4-speed was installed in 42% of 1972 Corvettes. Our average price on a 1971 Corvette Convertible is $23,500 I confirmed these values with Bob Kroupa, who writes for several of the Corvette magazines and publishes his own monthly newsletter, the Vette-N-Vestment’s Corvette Market Letter and he agreed that the 1972 Corvette Coupe with the 454 and AC would be valued higher than the 1971 roadster with a standard 350 ci and a 4-speed. I initially thought the 1971 Convertible with a 4-Speed coupled to a 350/270 would be worth more than a 1972 automatic Coupe with a 454/270 and AC. But only 14% of ’72 Vettes have the big block option and combined with the C60 Air option, there was no chance in overcoming that hand. So what trumps an automatic big block Corvette Coupe? For Robert, it just may be that feeling of driving down a Wisconsin road with the top down and the summer air blowing around you while shifting through the gears of the 4-speed.
Source:
Corvette Black Book
Corvette Price Guide Related:
Appreciating Corvettes: Top 12 Price Gainers of 2006 Technorati Tags:
| | | | |

Corvette Values: 1985 Lingenfelter Corvette Coupe

by Keith Cornett on July 3, 2007

GH from Washington submitted the following car to Corvette Values:

1985 Corvette Coupe1985 Corvette Coupe, red with graphite leather interior. VIN is 1G1YY0784F5121XXX. 59,000 Miles, 383 Lingenfelter conversion with the original motor crated and stored. Manual transmission. Power steering, brakes, windows, A/C. Borla mufflers. Paint is in good condition and interior is excellent. No documentation available.
The VIN #1G1YY0784FS121XXX indicates it was built midway through the 1985 production year at which time a total of 39,729 Coupes were built. This Corvette is Bright Red in color with a Graphite leather interior. The Bright Red paint was selected by the majority of buyers in the 1985 production year. The paint can be considered good, however, a few ‘road chips’ in the paint were noted. It is powered by a modified 383 Lingenfelter built motor. A Lingenfelter conversion has been a growing modification for late model Corvettes especially the C5 Corvette (1997-2004). This one can be termed an early conversion. The original motor was retained and has been crated for future use should this Corvette be returned to factory original condition. The existing motor is coupled with a manual transmission. This Corvette is equipped with the expected power steering, brakes and windows and also has air conditioning. From a price perspective, few 1985 Lingenfelter Corvette conversions are found and offered for sale today. On a comparative basis, a Callaway Twin Turbo motor was offered in 1987-91 at an option price of $20-30,000 depending on the model year. In today’s market, the Callaway option will add $10,000 to the average resale price of a Corvette. We place a value of $19,000 on this 1985 described Corvette Coupe based on the Callaway Turbo price rationale above. Corvette Appraisals:
With Corvette values rising yearly, make sure your insurance coverage keeps up with your Corvettes value by having it appraised online at VetteFinders.com. Our online appraisals are only $69.95 and are usually completed within three business days. Click here to start your Corvette appraisal now.
Source:
VetteFinders.com Appraisal Service
Related:
Corvette Generational Pricing Highlights of 2006
Appreciating Corvettes: Top 12 Price Gainers of 2006
Technorati Tags:
| |

Why do we like the Bloomington Gold High Performance Auction so much? It’s a pure Corvette event featuring over 500 Corvettes for sale, surrounded by the faithful who make the annual pilgrimage every year. Where other auctions are higher profile and attract the crazy money like Barrett-Jackson’s two events, the Corvette auction at Bloomington is a real harbinger of where the Corvette Market is. And that’s why we are very interested in the two 1953 Corvette Roadsters that will be hitting the auction block. 1953 Corvettes are special because they were the first. For the most part these Corvettes were hand assembled and had their issues. It was more of a touring car than sports car with its 6 cylinder Blue Flame engine. The 300 Corvettes produced during the first year of the Corvette is the lowest production number for any year since and that is part of its mystique. While performance junkies have driven up the pricing of midyears and fuelies over the last five years, the 1953 Corvette has for the most part sat quietly by and waited for its turn. So is 2007 the year the 1953 Corvette Roadster finally makes its move in the Collector Car market? These Corvettes don’t come up for sale very often, but already this year we’ve seen three 1953 Corvettes sell and with each sale, the bar is raised. And because of the low production, three Corvettes are significant as they represent 1% of the entire production quantity, and that’s making the assumption that all 300 are still around. In reality, the number is probably in the 250 range at best. The trend started in January at the Barrett-Jackson Collector Car Auction in Scottsdale. There, an NCRS Top Flight 1953 Corvette Roadster sold for $298,350. At the Houston Classic in May 2007, a 1953 Corvette Roadster was sold for $396,000. And then, just last weekend, the 1953 Corvette with a 12 year old Bloomington Gold certificate was sold for $440,000. All three sales prices include the auction commission. Here are the two 1953 Corvettes being offered this weekend by Mecum at the Bloomington Gold Auction:

1953 CorvetteLot S53 is expected to hit the block around 5:00pm on Saturday. It is Chassis #210 and has been housed in a climate controlled garage with the same owner for the last 13 years. The side curtains are included and stored in the trunk.
1953 CorvetteLot S91 is expected on the block at 6:45pm on Saturday. The Roadster is Chassis #107 and has a Bloomington Gold certificate. The Corvette is matching numbers and has just 120 on it since restoration. It’s a complete Corvette with the Convertible top, Side Curtains, Jack and Handle. This will be the one to watch on Saturday.
Will the trend continue at Bloomington or are we in for a reality check? Will we see these Corvettes get bid up but not reach the reserve price, thereby guaranteeing one or both will be trailered to Scottsdale in 2008? We’ll find out on Saturday and bring you the results next week.
Source:
Mecum Auctions Related:
Auction Results: 1953 Corvette Sells for $440,000 Technorati Tags:
| |

Sold on eBay: 6-Pack of Split Window Corvettes

by Keith Cornett on May 8, 2007

Collection of 6 1963 Split Window CorvettesSame old story. A guy amasses a collection of 1963 Corvette Coupes and stores them in a field for thirty frickin years. Finally he sells them all to a Corvette dealer who sells the entire lot on eBay. Despite the rambling and poor grammar in the ad, the six Corvettes sold Sunday for the winning bid of $140,000. The group of 63’s include Corvettes equipped with the following engines: Fuel Injected Original Numbers Matching
Air Conditioned Original Numbers Matching
340hp Black/Red Original Numbers Matching
300hp Silver/Red NOM
300hp Silver/Blue NOM
Wrecked body/frame The average price of $23,333 per car is in line with other recent project cars we’ve seen, considering you have at one end of the spectrum a matching numbers fuelie while at the other end you have, well, half a Corvette. And what’s up with that half-a-vette having a split window rear windshield and 1965-66 quarter panel? These cars took a lot of wear and tear while parked and getting them back is going to cost some dollars. With time and money anything can be restored.
Source:
eBay.com Related:
Barn Find: 1968 Corvette Convertible Technorati Tags:
| | |

Barn Find: 1968 Corvette Convertible

by Keith Cornett on April 18, 2007

As posted on the Corvette Forum, user Trophy Blue has a friend that found this 1968 Corvette Convertible with 34,000 original miles sitting in a barn. The Corvette was wrecked some 25 years earlier and the car was parked. According to the post, the Corvette sold for under $5,000.

1968 Corvette Barn Car - Interior 1968 Corvette Barn Car - damaged front end 1968 Corvette Barn Car - Optional Hard Top
For those that love barn stories in general, check out the post. Someone replied with a photo that shows 16 Chevelles rotting in a field. Of course you know that someday the owner is going to fix them up and sell them at Barrett-Jackson. He’s just “storing” them until he’s ready. From a pricing perspective this could be a real good buy depending on how the new owner can turn it around. It was the 1968 Corvette T-Top model that led the way at 17% in this year’s Top Appreciating Corvettes from our Corvette Price Guide. The one year appreciation figure for the 1968 Corvette Roadster is 11%.
Source:
CorvetteForum.com Related:
Corvette Barn Find Technorati Tags:
|

Corvette Values: 1989 Corvette Coupe

by Keith Cornett on March 6, 2007

DS of Florida submitted this 1989 Corvette Coupe to Corvette Values:

1989 Corvette Coupe 1989 Corvette Coupe. VIN 1G1YY2187K5118XXX. 1,790 original one-owner miles. Red with red leather interior, L98 5.7 liter 245 hp engine. 6-Speed manual transmission and performance handling package. Leather sport seats, Blue tint removable top, power driver and passenger seats, and Delco Bose stereo system. Excellent condition inside and out. Docs include original bill of sale, temporary tag and installment contract.
This red Corvette coupe has only 1,790 miles and is in excellent condition. Few, if any, 1989 Corvettes are in existence today with this low, low mileage. The VIN # indicates it was built early in the second quarter of the 1989 production year. The curb appeal is excellent with the Red paint. The Corvette is powered by the standard 5.7 liter L98 350 ci/240 hp engine coupled with a rare 6-speed manual transmission. Only 16% of 1989 Corvettes had the manual transmission. It has nearly all of popular options including Leather Sport Seats, Blue-Tint Removable Top, and Power Driver and Passenger Seats. It also has the rare Z51 Performance Handling Package, an option found in only 8% of 1989 Corvettes. Important ingredients in establishing the value of a Corvette are mileage, condition, originality and original delivery documents. This Corvette meets all of these criteria including the original purchase document. We place a value of $25,000 on the described 1989 Sport Coupe. In addition, the average price of a 1989 Corvette Coupe today is showing a one year appreciation factor of 5%. Corvette Appraisals:
With Corvette values rising yearly, make sure your insurance coverage keeps up with your Corvettes value by having it appraised online at VetteFinders.com. Our online appraisals are only $69.95 and are usually completed within three business days. Click here to start your Corvette appraisal now.
Source:
VetteFinders.com Appraisal Service
Related:
Corvette Generational Pricing Highlights of 2006
Appreciating Corvettes: Top 12 Price Gainers of 2006
Technorati Tags:
| |

Corvette Generational Pricing Highlights of 2006

by Keith Cornett on February 9, 2007

Today we conclude our annual Corvette pricing series by taking a look at the Corvette generational pricing highlights of 2006. The years have been good to Corvette and their owners. Every model from 1953-1982 shows yearly appreciation. The newest models are those depreciating, as they should. Yet performance models like the Z06 or special editions like the 1996 Collector Editions and Grand Sports are either holding their own or showing modest appreciation. How many other cars can you point to that offer the same type of investment quality for a fair amount depending on the model and year? The following are highlights from the 2007 Corvette Price Guide: 1953-1962:
1961 Corvette RoadsterGood price performance for these early models with half of them showing double digit appreciation. Last year, in total, these models were the appreciation leaders. This year they share top honors with the mid-year Corvettes. The entry level Corvette for the series continues to be the 1961 model with an average resale price of $41,400 showing an 8% appreciation factor. This is the first year one of the entry models crossed the $40,000 threshold. 1963-1967:
1964 Corvette CoupeThe appreciation range for the mid-years was +2 to +13% with seven of the ten in the series showing double digit appreciation. On average, the mid-years showed the same appreciation factor as the early models during the 2006 calendar year. Their numbers were just short of the 10% mark. At the top of the list, from an average price perspective was the 1967 Roadster at an average price of $52,500. Once again the 1964 Coupe was the entry level Corvette breaking the $30,000 threshold at $31,500. The Roadster continues to command $1,500-$4,500 more than a comparable equipped Coupe with the exception of the 1963 models where the Coupe commands an additional $6,000. In the high price category, all but the 1964 models sold over the $100,000 mark. Of course, these models were an array of Corvettes that had low mileage originals, or were restored, equipped with high performance motors, special options, certification and or/documentation. They were definitely not your typical street driven Corvette. 1968-1982:
1978 T-Top CorvetteThis generation showed a wide range of average prices from a low of $8,600 to almost $26,000. The entry level Corvette a 1978 T-Top reflected a 4% appreciation factor. This “low” price can be attributed to all of the interest in the 1978 T-Top’s companion models, the Silver Anniversary and the Pace Car. These two models represented almost 50% of the 1978 production line. The price leader in the series was the 1970 Roadster, no change from one year ago, at a new average price of $25,900 showing a 9% appreciation factor. When we look at the 1968-1971 models, appreciation levels are comparable to the 1953-1967 models shown in our appreciation chart. The appreciation factor for this series ranged from +2% to +17%. The special editions in the series, The Silver Anniversary, Pace Car and Collector Edition, were all in the +4% to +6% appreciation range. The Pace Car was the price leader at $20,900, followed by the Collector Edition at $18,800 and the Silver Anniversary at $13,500. The price spread between the T-Top and Roadster ranged from $4,400 to $8,800. The latter being the 1975 Roadster at $18,500 compared to the T-Top at $9,700. This time, we see the “last” mystic applied to the Roadster model until the Roadster was reintroduced in 1986. 1984-1996:
1987 Corvette CoupeThis series showed good appreciation results with most of the models moving toward the appreciation classification. The appreciation factor ranged from -4% to +8% for this series. None of the Corvettes reflected double digit appreciation, however 23 of the 38 models showed positive results, seven had no change and eight showed depreciation results. One a comparative basis going back two years, 26 of the 38 Corvettes in this series showed depreciation results; one year ago the number had dropped to 20. The trend is definitely going in the right direction. The high price leader in average price was the 1996 Grand Sport Roadster at $43,400. It is considered rare with the production of only 190 units built. It also showed an 8% appreciation factor this year. It partner, the Coupe, also did well at $33,600 for a +6% appreciation. The ZR-1s in the group showed modest appreciation in the +1 to +3% range with the exception being the 1995 model showing -4% at $41,200. The 1990 ZR-1 continues to sell in the mid-twenties at $26,300. On average the Roadster continues to command $4,000 more than the Coupe. The entry level prices are below the $10,000 with average prices starting at $8,200 for the 1984 Coupe escalating slightly each year to the 1987 Coupe at $9,900. 1997-2004:
2003 Z06 CorvetteThe C5 models continue to head in the right direction as only one showed double digit depreciation in 2006, the previously mentioned 1999 Hardtop. Eleven of the models show depreciation levels at -5% or below compared to -9% one year ago. On the plus side of the ledger, three have reached the plus plateau, the 1998 Coupe at +3% at $20,500, the 1998 Pace Car at +2% at $28,000, and the 2002 Z06 at +2% at $32,500. And the 2003 Z06 was not change at $36,000. Roadster prices compared to the Coupes again had a $3,000 price spread. It is interesting to note the price gap closes in the resale market compared to an average difference of approximately $8,000 between the Roadster and Coupe when purchased new. Another interesting comparison is the Roadster to the Z06. The Z06 has the resale pricing edge at $500-$1,000. Evidently more horsepower outweighs “dropping the top”, however this was the average price spread when purchasing these Corvettes new. You may get tired of hearing this, but the C5 is an outstanding buy in today’s resale market. 2005-2007:
2006 Corvette ConvertibleThere is not much new to add here. Double depreciation for the new Roadster and Coupe after the drive off the showroom floor is normal. The Z06 prices are holding, settling down to the list price rather than the “pent up over sticker” prices given to be an early owner of these power machines. Our database showed the 2006 Z06 at a modest -1% depreciation factor. Should the Corvette Super Sport 650HP model be announced as a production vehicle, the impact on the sixth generation Z06 will be interesting to see! The 2007 Corvette Price Guide contains data from the sales of over 5,800 Corvettes from last year to give us the High, Low, and Average prices of all Corvette model years and body styles. The guide also contains appreciation and depreciation figures for One, Two and Five years, as well as pricing for options including motors, wheels and A/C. Available now for $20 through the VetteFinders.com online store. Shipping is now free.
Source:
VetteFinders.com
Data Provided by Vette-N-Vestments Related:
VetteFinders.com Releases Annual Corvette Price Guide
Appreciating Corvettes: Top 12 Price Gainers of 2006
Depreciating Corvettes: Top 12 Price Declines of 2006 Technorati Tags:
| |

Depreciating Corvettes: Top 12 Price Declines of 2006

by Keith Cornett on February 8, 2007

The depreciation chart starts with the 2006 C6 generation – certainly no surprise. The double digit depreciation is the norm for a new Corvette that has been on the street for more than two years. The same holds true for the last of the C5 models, 2004 Corvettes. Evidently there is not a “last model” mystic for the C5 generation yet.

TOP DEPRECIATION MODELS
Year Model % Change Average Price
2006 Coupe -15% $43,500
2006 Roadster -14% $51,500
2005 Roadster -13% $48,000
1999 Hardtop -12% $19,000
2005 Coupe -11% $39,500
2000 Roadster -8% $25,800
2000 Hardtop -8% $20,800
2001 Roadster -7% $28,000
2003 Roadster -7% $35,500
2003 50th Roadster -6% $38,000
2004 Coupe -6% $34,000
2004 Roadster -6% $38,500
1999 Corvette HardtopThe early hardtops, 1999 and 2000 made the list with their special body style without any performance enhancements, as well as no removable top options. This ties in with the fact that no Z06’s made the depreciation list this year. Adding performance to the hardtop made a big difference from a resale perspective.
2003 50th Anniversary RoadsterThe 2003 Anniversary Roadster made the depreciation chart this year showing a -6% factor in average resale price. As one may recall, the 2003 Anniversary model was available in a Coupe and a Roadster at an add-on price of $5,000 for the Anniversary package that included the preferred equipment group and F-55 Magnetic Selection Ride Control. Had these two options been ordered on a non-anniversary model, the price tag would have been $2,895, making the true cost of the Anniversary package $2,105. The production for the Anniversary Roadster was 7,547 units and the Coupe at 4,085. The 2003 Anniversary Coupe is showing a 5% depreciation in average price. The difference can be related to the Coupe being the rarer of the two models with less production numbers. Bottom Line: Compared to one year ago, the C5 Corvettes show a lesser degree of depreciation. These models are a truly outstanding buy in today’s resale market considering their performance, handling and comfort/convenience features. Tomorrow, we’ll conclude our annual Corvette pricing series by taking a look at the Corvette generational pricing highlights of 2006. The 2007 Corvette Price Guide contains data from the sales of over 5,800 Corvettes from last year to give us the High, Low, and Average prices of all Corvette model years and body styles. The guide also contains appreciation and depreciation figures for One, Two and Five years, as well as pricing for options including motors, wheels and A/C. Available now for $20 through the VetteFinders.com online store. Shipping is now free.
Source:
VetteFinders.com
Data Provided by Vette-N-Vestments Related:
Appreciating Corvettes: Top 12 Price Gainers of 2006
VetteFinders.com Releases Annual Corvette Price Guide Technorati Tags:
| |
Page 6 of 10« First...45678...Last »