20,000 Corvettes for 2020? Here is How We Get There and How They Are Configured (Updated)

12187

20,000 Corvettes for 2020? Here is How We Get There and How They Are Configured


Corvette Product Manager Harlan Charles shared Friday during the National Corvette Museum’s Corvette Team Seminar that previously built 2020 Corvettes plus already accepted dealer orders for 2020 Corvettes total 20,181 possible 2020 Corvettes.

Assuming that the report of a November 2nd model year change proves accurate, here is how we get to 20,000 Corvettes produced during the 2020 model year:

  • Normal build rate is 11.5 cars per hour. (NOTE: This figure already accounts for downtime. Additional explanation below.)
  • For each 8-hour shift, 92 cars can be built.
  • Each shift can build 460 cars per week.
  • There are 22 weeks between now and November 2.
  • In 22 weeks, one shift can build 10,120 cars.
  • That leaves 7,000 cars for a second shift to complete, which would require the second shift running for 15 weeks.
  • The second shift only needs to start by July 20 in order for the 17,000 number to be achieved.

Assuming there are no further COVID-19 related disruptions, including supplier-related disruptions, 20,000 Corvettes built for the 2020 model year definitely seems attainable.

Additional Production Volume Information

During the National Corvette Museum’s Ambassador Convention on November 1, 2017, Plant Director, Kai Spande, provided the following production information after the 2017 plant retooling:

  • C7 daily production volume prior to retooling: 17.2 units per hour/137 per 8 hour shift
  • C7 takt time was approximately 3.5 minutes per station prior to retooling
  • C7 daily production volume after retooling: 11.6 units per hour/93 per 8 hour shift

Data source: https://youtu.be/R_dSECWDuDk

Daily production information was also provided during the National Corvette Museum’s Birthday Bash on April 26, 2018.

  • C7 daily production volume averaged 116 cars during each 10-hour shift (the plant was on a 4 day/10 hours per day work week at the time)
  • It was noted that the pre-retooling production rate used to be roughly 17.5 cars per hour and was now 11.5 cars per hour. (11.5 cars per hour referenced at 20:38 in the video)

Data source: https://youtu.be/v8ZmFF-oaQo

During the NCM’s 25th Anniversary Celebration, the following production information was provided on August 29, 2019.

  • The desired takt time is about 4.5 minutes per station.
  • 2020 production should start at around 6 minutes takt time.
  • The benchmark rate for getting to full speed production is 6 to 7 weeks.

Data source: (starts with my question and Kai Spande’s response at 35:21 in the video) https://youtu.be/TbpdAmCsKkU

Finally, Kai Spande provided a plant update seminar during the NCM’s Virtual Bash on May 28, 2020 and once again stated that takt time is 4.5 minutes per station.

While a target takt time of 4.5 minutes would result in an hourly production volume of 13.33 cars per hour (60/4.5=13.33), the 4.5 minute figure is the target so that the desired net production volume can be 11.5 or 11.6 cars per hour. The 11.5 or 11.6 figure accounts for down time and other interruptions. This goal translates to a net takt time of 5.2 minutes per car, providing the desired volume of 11.54 cars per hour.

Based on the information presented Friday, here’s how we can anticipate 2020 Corvette production breaking down:

Coupes – 16,750
1LT – 2,680
2LT – 6,700
3LT – 7,370

Convertibles – 3,431
1LT – 275
2LT – 1,235
3LT – 1,921

Chassis
FE1 Non-Z51 – 4,843
FE3 Z51 – 4,440
FE3 Z51+MR – 10,898

Exterior Colors
(note: numbers on the chart equal 101%, so the following numbers add up to 20,383)
Torch Red – 5,045
Arctic White – 3,027
Black – 2,422
Sebring Orange – 1,413
Elkhart Lake Blue – 1,413
Rapid Blue – 1,211
Ceramic Matrix Gray – 1,211
Blade Silver – 1,211
Shadow Gray – 1,211
Long Beach Red – 1,009
Accelerate Yellow – 605
Zeus Bronze – 605

Interior Colors
Jet Black – 5,651
Jet Black w/Red – 2,422
Jet Black w/Yellow – 605
Adrenaline Red – 5,045
Sky Cool Gray – 1,816
Natural – 2,422
Natural Dipped – 1,211
Two-Tone Blue – 807
Morello Red – 202

Corvette Team Presentation at the NCM Bash


Corvette Team Presentation at the NCM Bash


Corvette Team Presentation at the NCM Bash


Editor’s Note This post was updated with additional information about the production process based on previously discussed information from representatives of the Bowling Green Assembly Plant.


Source:
National Corvette Museum

Related:
[PICS] The Corvette Team Announces No Price Increases for 2021 Corvettes at the NCM Virtual Bash
Corvette Racing’s Doug Fehan Offers Update at the Virtual NCM Bash
[PICS] Corvette Assembly Plant Manager Kai Spande Provides Production Update During the Virtual NCM Bash

 



8 COMMENTS

  1. Highly doubtful! The factory is way behind now, and the virus will probably cause the factory to reclose before the year is over. GM and the UAW bickering earlier this year really disrupted the production of the C8, many more cars would have been produced if it wasn’t for the strike. Unfortunately, only less than 3,000 have been produced so far, frustrating owners who looked forward to taking delivery of a new Stingray in 2020. Between the lack of vehicles produced, poor quality control issues, and the uncertainty of future work stoppages, the new C8 isn’t off to a good start.

  2. With all the problems in the world today, and at GM. The best decision might be to wait until next year. Maybe 2021 will be a better year.

  3. NEVER!!! They are only doing 5 per hour now. In 2 months of real production they never came close to 11 per hour…

  4. Glad to see they have a plan of how to get the C8 on order built as I have a Convertible on order. Some of the numbers above on Exterior Color are the same that seems very strange as if something doesn’t add up here? I’m very disappointed to see GM is having trouble with their supplier of the High Wing Spoiler, if 18% wanted it what were they planing on? Understand the Ground Effects Kits are available from 2 or 3 different sources? Seems like GM just doesn’t want to deal with what they promised on the Configurator? That doesn’t feel right to me maybe they just want to push the money to the dealers to install the stuff later? Not sure but it stinks to me. May cancel my order because of GM lack of ability to keep their promise in the Configurator, after all if they can’t get it right up front with this car not sure they will get it right going forward.

  5. I’ve added some additional production volume information that should prove helpful:

    Additional Production Volume Information

    During the National Corvette Museum’s Ambassador Convention on November 1, 2017, Plant Director, Kai Spande, provided the following production information after the 2017 plant retooling:

    – C7 daily production volume prior to retooling: 17.2 units per hour/137 per 8 hour shift
    – C7 takt time was approximately 3.5 minutes per station prior to retooling
    – C7 daily production volume after retooling: 11.6 units per hour/93 per 8 hour shift

    Data source: 
    https://youtu.be/R_dSECWDuDk

    Daily production information was also provided during the National Corvette Museum’s Birthday Bash on April 26, 2018.

    – C7 daily production volume averaged 116 cars during each 10-hour shift (the plant was on a 4 day/10 hours per day work week at the time)
    – It was noted that the pre-retooling production rate used to be roughly 17.5 cars per hour and was now 11.5 cars per hour.  (11.5 cars per hour referenced at 20:38 in the video)

    Data source: 
    https://youtu.be/v8ZmFF-oaQo

    During the NCM’s 25th Anniversary Celebration, the following production information was provided on August 29, 2019.

    – The desired takt time is about 4.5 minutes per station.
    – 2020 production should start at around 6 minutes takt time.
    – The benchmark rate for getting to full speed production is 6 to 7 weeks.

    Data source: (starts with my question and Kai Spande’s response at 35:21 in the video) 
    https://youtu.be/TbpdAmCsKkU

    Finally, Kai Spande provided a plant update seminar during the NCM’s Virtual Bash on May 28, 2020 and once again stated that takt time is 4.5 minutes per station.

    While a target takt time of 4.5 minutes would result in an hourly production volume of 13.33 cars per hour (60/4.5=13.33), the 4.5 minute figure is the target so that the desired net production volume can be 11.5 or 11.6 cars per hour.  The 11.5 or 11.6 figure accounts for down time and other interruptions.  This goal translates to a net takt time of 5.2 minutes per car, providing the desired volume of 11.54 cars per hour.

Comments are closed.