[POLL] What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?

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[POLL] What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?


Happy Friday Corvette friends!

Today we need your opinion for our next Friday Poll. For today’s survey we’re asking about barn find Corvettes again. This time is slightly different, though. This time we’re talking about this barn find 489-mile 1972 Corvette coupe that was shown at the Muscle Car and Corvette Nationals last month in Chicago.

In our previous barn find polls we’ve looked at a barn fresh black 1957 fuelie Corvette and unique silver/silver 1966 air conditioned coupe. Each of those cars were shown in their as-found condition just like the 1972 coupe below, but those cars had been driven and enjoyed. This untouched 454-equipped C3 has just 489 actual miles on the odometer and even sits on its original tires.

[POLL] What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?


The car was being shown by owner James Anderson who purchased in November 2017 from the original owner. In addition to the big block up front, the car is loaded up with an automatic transmission, power windows, power brakes, rear window defogger, leather interior, and AM/FM stereo. Other than a few areas around the rear edge of each door, the car wears a 46-year-old layer of dust all over it. We’re told that after a thorough fluid replacement the car fired right up, and the A/C even worked!

[POLL] What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?


So that inevitably leads to the question of what do you do with this car? Do you leave it covered in dust like it is now and leave everything else alone? Clean it up and run it through NCRS, Bloomington Gold, and MCACN judging? Drive it? Personally, I think I’d show as-is for a while then clean it up, put a couple hundred miles on it and do the judging circuit with it. When else would you ever have the chance to drive a brand new 1972 Corvette?

What would you do with this 489-mile 1972 Corvette?

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What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?
What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?
What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?
What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?
What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?
What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?
What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette? What Would You do with this Barn Find 489-Mile 1972 Corvette?


Source:
Photos by Steve Burns

Related:
[POLL] What Should Be Done With This Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette?
[POLL] What Would You do With this Barn Fresh 1966 Corvette?
[POLL] Have You Given a Name to Your Corvette?

 

11 COMMENTS

  1. Yea clean it up was my vote. Dust is so relative and can build up in a short time under different conditions. It’s cool to find a car like that (dusty) but it’s also cool for the original owner to still own it. Since it changed hands that means it changed plans as well.
    Save the tires and wheels for the shows, don’t even separate them. The judges will really like to compare notes on this one depending on month of production and the hobby needs this to straighten out some finer points that are probably controversial right now. My 67 got dusty like that in one year after sitting in the area of my bodywork on another car. I wrote barn find on it and laughed out loud at remarks people made about it.

  2. ….i would make foto’s and film every angle as is, and than drive and enjoy it….after al cars are made to drive….

  3. Wash and detail it! Then replace items that will fail, hoses, belts etc. then I would drain, flush all fluids.

  4. I know I would just clean it up giving it some TLC. It worked for me and my 70 chevy Nova, it appraised out higher then any of my friend’s fully restored cars. My Nova was featured as the Centerfold in Collectible Automobile Magazine.

  5. Clean it up, refresh the hoses & fluid. Like one guy said keep it under a 1000 miles and watch the offers pour in to see eho’s The highest bidder. From a little kid I think that’s when I fell in love with the Vettes. Beautiful cars those 71&72’s. Mostly all of them a beautiful; those were some of the firsts. But I can’t leave out those late fifty’s model either.

  6. Clean it…update & upgrade brakes & driveline components & swap engine out with a new LS7 for modern HP along with fuel economy & reliability. Life’s way too short, enjoy every moment given because you can’t take it with you!

  7. Clean it up, check all fluids, hoses ,belts ,etc. Restore it and enjoy it. I have a similar 1972, 23,000 mi. Same paint,power brakes ,windows ,steering 350 auto, even a/c working. I have been restoring it for about a year. Car is pretty much original except for the new parts going in. Drive as often as weather allows.

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