What Should Be Done With This Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette?

[POLL] What Should Be Done With This Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette?

[POLL] What Should Be Done With This Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette?

Article and photos contributed by Steve Burns

Visitors to Bloomington Gold’s Great Hall this year were immediately greeted by barn fresh and very rare 1957 fuel injected Corvette recently rescued from years of storage before reaching the main display area. The car was presented with all the dirt, dust, and debris still present on it. The Bloomington Gold folks were taking a survey to learn the public’s opinion on what to do with the car. To help out, take the survey after the jump and we’ll forward on the results.

Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette at Bloomington Gold Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette at Bloomington Gold Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette at Bloomington Gold
Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette at Bloomington Gold Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette at Bloomington Gold Barn Fresh 1957 Corvette at Bloomington Gold

How should this 1957 Corvette be restored?

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As for our opinion, We think it should just be cleaned up and used as a learning tool for restorers and enthusiasts. Let us know what you think should be done with it by leaving a comment below.


Related:
Corvettes on Craigslist: 1961 Corvette Barn Find in Atlanta
Mike Yager’s 1957 Corvette Barn Find

 

13 COMMENTS

  1. I’d like to see it cleaned up, but actually voted to keep it as a barn car. The reason being is that it can be kept as a barn car for a short period (possibly a year or 18 months) to give enthusiasts a chance to see it as a barn find. Then it could be cleaned up and kept in that condition for the remainder of its life. Disassembly and restoration would ruin the car and its “time capsule” quality because a restoration almost always corrects minor flaws that were unique to this particular car.

    There will come a time in another 20 years when the barn finds will no longer be 50’s vintage, but 70’s vintage. To see a barn find Corvette will be nearly impossible to imagine while fully restored cars will be more readily available.

  2. Or, tear it down and restore it, all the while making a detailed website that explains how to properly restore everything from sand-blasting to detailing.

  3. Consult with NCRS. Most likely clean very carefully with non-detergent soap and hot water being careful to leave all markings and labels intact. Do not even think about disassembling or tearing down. It is only original once.

  4. The problem with cleaning something like that is you would almost have to take it all apart. And if you are going to take it apart, you might as well restore it. I say restore it and do what Corn-vette said.

  5. Restore this beauty and drive the heck out it. I’ll be glad to put it in my
    barn to restore it.

  6. I voted to clean it up, but I wish there was a category that was clean it up and have it as a survivor. Not sure what is meant by used as a training tool.

  7. All Corvettes must be restored to their full glory for all to enjoy. If they were a “barn find” or otherwise, take videos or photo then full restoration should be done.

  8. I voted to restore it only because I don’t think it would cost 10 sticker prices to do. I was torn between cleaning it up, and restoring it, but after getting as good of a look as I could, I went with restore it for reason mentioned above. Also as Chris mentions, it would take an almost total tear down to clean it up. It’s Americas only true sports car. Go 110% on it.

  9. Aw, shucks, I’ll come get as is!!! Then, I will lightly clean and put on public display with full documentation for all fo enjoy.

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