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C2 Corvette

Mecum’s High Performance Auction in St. Charles, Illinois last weekend was definitely the place to find some rare Corvettes. We already detailed the auction’s top Corvette seller, a low-mileage one owner 1969 L88 Corvette which sold for $446,250. The second highest sale from the October 5-7th auction went to a very special 435 hp ’67 Coupe which sold for $393,750. You know a Corvette is special when it’s known throughout Vettedom by a nickname. The Black ‘N Blue 1967 Corvette earned the name due to its Tuxedo Black exterior with the Bright Blue Stinger hood. What? You haven’t seen this color combo before? That’s because only four documented ’67 Sting Rays are known to share this very rare exterior color combination. This particular Corvette was restored by Houston’s famous Nabers Brothers, who also restored ProTeam’s Last Sting Ray. Featured options include the L71 427 ci/435 hp Tri-Power engine, factory side mounted exhaust, a close-ratio Muncie M21 4-Speed and 3:55 gears. Although not original on 1967 Corvettes, this Corvette has “Blue Line” Goodyears mounted to the factory original bolt-on wheels.

The Black 'N Blue 1967 Corvette The Black 'N Blue 1967 Corvette The Black 'N Blue 1967 Corvette
The Corvette’s original color was changed early in its life. Luckily, fate would lead to an inspection of the original trim tag by Corvette Hall of Fame member Dan Gale, which revealed the rare factory code 900 Tuxedo Black and Bright Blue stripe combination. Today the Corvette, with its Code 415 Bright Blue Leather interior is correct and outstanding in every detail, earning a Bloomington Gold Certification, NCRS Top Flight and the Chevy Vette Fest Triple Crown Award. A check of prices for 1967 Corvettes sold at auction against Keith Martin’s Corvette Auction Results Database shows we have a top 10 Corvette based on the selling price of $393,750. Truly a beautiful and unique 1967 Corvette Coupe.
Source:
Mecum Auctions Related:
Auction Results: Record Sale of 1969 Corvette L88 at St. Charles Technorati Tags:
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1963 Split Window Corvette Featured in PGR4 Commercials

by Keith Cornett on October 8, 2007

The story of these videos is that a section of streets in downtown Los Angeles was closed for a commercial shoot for the Project Gotham Racing video game. The commercial features a Tesla Roadster, a Mercedes Benz SLR McLaren, a Ferrari F430, a Yamaha motorcycle and our favorite, a 1963 Split Window Coupe Corvette. The cars were driven by professionals, but were “supposedly” driving in a manner that was to reflect the skills of everyday drivers. In other words, there were several near misses in the intersection and at one point the Ferrari (unintentionally, I believe) hit the retaining wall. (note: If the player asks you to click here to view more videos in the playlist, just reload the page)

Watch these videos and then tell me driving like this wouldn’t be a blast. That Sting Ray’s exhaust reverberating off the downtown walls of is awesome!
Source:
YouTube.com Related:
1958 Corvette Featured in New Viagra Commercial and Website Technorati Tags:
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Rare Pininfarina Corvette Heading for Barrett-Jackson

by Keith Cornett on October 2, 2007

We are about 100 days out from January’s Barrett-Jackson’s Collector Car auction in Scottsdale, Arizona and details are beginning to emerge about some of the “talent” that will be hitting the auction block. Corvettes are always well represented and that should remain the case despite plans to cut back the number of vehicles from around 1,200 to 1,000.

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Sunday Afternoon Tradition: Washing the Corvette!

by Keith Cornett on July 8, 2007

In my view, there’s nothing better than wrapping up the weekend with a car wash for my Corvette. After a week of work and even more work around the house on the weekend, the car wash gives me a chance to play with the Corvette and get her ready for the next time she’s out.

I’m not an obsessive car washer, but I do have my routine down pat. Like a surgeon, I get everything I need from wash to dry ready to go before a single drop of water touches the paint. I’m not really committed to any one product or brand when it comes to detailing products, so no product pitches today. However I am interested in trying Adam’s Polishes when its time to wax again, but that is a blog post for another time.

I’m not going to bore you the details of how some guy washes his Corvette. However, I will share with you something I learned a while back that makes drying a wet car, especially a black car, a piece cake. Your neighbors will laugh at you because this technique totally fits the image of the compulsive car washer.

I wash a section at a time (hood, driver’s side, rear) and then rinse. But when I rinse I always go back and rinse all the sections I washed previously so that when I finish the last section, the whole car is still very wet. Then I pull out my trusty Toro leaf blower and keeping it about 12 to 18 inches from the body, I blow the water off the car, starting with hood and working my way down and to the rear. Black cars are very susceptible to showing water spots, but the blower removes most of the water before it can dry. It’s especially good at getting water from under the emblems and around the lights and exhaust bezels. When I have about 75% of the water off the car, I then finish drying with a couple of microfiber towels.

Washing a 1966 Corvette Convertible Washing a 1966 Corvette Convertible Washing a 1966 Corvette Convertible

Using a blower as part of the drying process you’ll save time and effort and you will use less towels. And best of all, no more water spots!

If there are any C2 Convertible owners out there, I’d especially like to hear how you wash your rear deck where the top folds under. I’m always paranoid that I’m going to soak the interior.

Got any good car washing tips? Let me know!


Related:
Upclose and Personal With the Indy 500 Corvette Pace Car

 

Flickr Photo of the Day: 1965 Corvette Coupe

by Keith Cornett on July 1, 2007

From the Flickr Corvette Pool.

1965 Corvette Coupe
Photo Credit: jryle79
1965 Corvette Options and Facts There were 23,564 Corvettes produced in 1965. Production was split between 8,186 Coupes and 15,378 Convertibles. Base Price for the Coupe was $4,321.00 while the Convertible model was priced slightly less at $4,106.00 6 different engine options available:
     327 ci 250 hp
     327 ci 300 hp (L75)
     327 ci 350 hp (L79)
     327 ci 365 hp (L76)
     327 ci 375 hp (L84 – Fuel Injection)
     396 ci 425 hp (L78) 8 Exterior Colors Available:
     Nassau Blue was most popular at 6,022 (26%)
     Tuxedo Black was the rarest at 1,191 (5%) How to Spot a 1965 Corvette:
The 1965 and 1966 both have three vertical vents behind the front tires. But the 1965 Corvette’s grill was unique to the C2 generation. Horizontal grill bars were changed to black, but the outer trim is bright. The 1966 Corvette’s grill is referred to as an egg crate because of its mesh design. The only logo on the 1965′s hood is the center-fixed Cross Flags. The 1966 Corvette has the Corvette Sting Ray script logo in the front right corner. Highlights:
The big block 396 ci 425 hp engine made its debut in March 1965, a mid year addition which required the need for a new hood with a center bulge. The ’65 Corvette was the last year of the fuel injected engine until the Cross Fire Injected engines were introduced in 1982. 1965 also marks the first year that four-wheel disc brakes were included as standard equipment. A power antenna was also standard. The instrument cluster was restyled with black flat faces and the center dash area where the radio was located was painted rather than vinyl covered.
Source:
Flickr.com
Corvette Black Book Related:
Flickr Photo of the Day: 1959 Corvette Technorati Tags:
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Today is National Drive Your Corvette To Work Day and so I thought I would do just that. Despite the fact that I work in a home office, I was able to get the Corvette out on my weekly trip to our server hosting center to change out my backup tapes. As I mentioned in my earlier post today, this is also the 41st anniversary of my father buying the Corvette, so it was a nice way to celebrate that milestone as well.

Even if you didn’t or couldn’t drive your Corvette to work today, just get it out soon and enjoy yourself. These cars were meant to be driven!
Source:
Mid America Motorworks Related:
June 29th is Drive Your Corvette To Work Day Technorati Tags:
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SEMA Corvette Super Coupe Concept

by Keith Cornett on June 24, 2007

The V7 Super CoupeLos Jalops got us a pic of American Super Car’s Corvette Super Coupe Concept that is being built for the SEMA show in Las Vegas later this year. The concept, officially called the V7 Super Coupe will be powered by a Chevy LS motor with twin-turbos that should bring up the horsepower output to 1,000. Smoking!


Source:
Jalopnik.com

Related:
SEMA’s Outrageous C6 Corvette

 

When Customizing Corvettes Goes Too Far

by Keith Cornett on September 1, 2006

One of the timeless debates about classic Corvettes revolves around modding/customization versus the pursuit of Matching Numbers restoration. We see these conversations all the time on some of the forums and people are usually quite passionate on both sides of the debate.

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A One-Of-A-Kind 1967 Corvette. Really!

by Keith Cornett on June 24, 2006

A One-Of-A-Kind 1967 Corvette. Really!

The great thing about being involved in the Corvette hobby is that there is always something new to learn. For example, you may have heard of a COPO Corvette – which stands for Central Office Production Order, an ordering mechanism designed to allow certain customers (usually dealers) the ability to order non-standard components together. Usually with Corvettes, COPO orders had non-standard colors or interiors, or was ordered with some special options, or no options like radio/heater delete for racing. Another type of order was called the SO – Shop Order – which usually originated from the Chevrolet Engineering Center or the GM Styling Studio. The third and less common was a variation called the F&SO – Fleet and Special Order.

Well, that last one was news to me. Just last week at the Bloomington Gold show, there were a few examples of COPO Corvettes and styling cars that went through the auction. Today though I got a preview of the next Corvette Magazine issue and writer/photographer Richard Prince has a great article detailing a F&SO 1967 Corvette that was built for one of the great Corvette salespeople of 1950′s and ’60′s – Bob Wingate.

When you’re the top Corvette salesman in the country for 5 years running, opportunities from the manufacturer come your way. And in 1967, that opportunity came in the form of a 1967 Coupe outfitted with a 427/435 engine, 3.55:1 Positraction and a Wide-Ratio M20 Four Speed, along with American Racing’s Torq-Thrust Alloy Wheels with Blue Streak tires. The Corvette was painted in Goodwood Green with a white racing stripe and had the six taillight modification that was popular back then.

Bob drove the Corvette all over the western United States promoting Chevrolet products. He did some drag racing and autocrossing in the Corvette, and when the 1967 model year was coming to a close, Bob sold the Corvette and was allowed to keep the proceeds as his bonus.

The kid that bought Bob’s Corvette blew the original engine within a few months, and a few months later was involved in a wreck on the I-10 that totaled the car. Or so Bob thought.

Fast forward twenty-five years later. A Southern Californian named Bob Radke buys a project car and although he didn’t know it at the time, it still had the tank sticker. And unlike all other tank stickers Radke had seen, in the upper right hand site in the box marked COPO/F&SO there was a number in it.

Through diligence and hard work, Radke was able to track down Wingate (he was listed in the phone book!) and from there a bond was formed as Radke set out to restore the Corvette. After 7 years, the Corvette has been restored to its former glory. I love these kinds of stories and the article is very written with awesome photos to boot!

The full article can be found at: Corvette-Mag.com

Photo Credit: Richard Prince

 

Seller of Fake L88 Caught by Corvette Community

by Keith Cornett on January 1, 2006

1967 Shriner Corvettes at the St. Louis Factory

You got to love Corvette people. They are the backbone of this great hobby and it’s great to see them rally around a cause. What’s the cause you ask? After spotting an apparently fraudulently represented 1967 L88 Corvette for sale on eBay, the message boards on both the CorvetteForum.com and NCRS.org started lighting up with news and information about this Corvette and its checkered history.

The 67 Corvette in question was listed with a reserve on eBay December 21st. The description lists the car as a real L88 Corvette – one of 20 in existence. The ad also has 17 photos showing different angles of the car, engine pad stamps and documentation including the dealer bill of sale and protect-o-plate.

As word spread of the L88 Corvette’s eBay listing, details slowly emerged that put the originality of the car into question. First, many users on the Corvette Forum started sharing photos of the stamped engine pad from the L88 and comparing those with other known L88′s and big block Corvette engines. The eBay L88′s stamp looked straight and flawless. The etchings were shiny as well and looked nothing like the other examples being shown.

And then came a post from GL Anderson whose father was the dealer that received the Corvette from the St. Louis factory and drove it in parades with the Shriners as one of their Patrol Corvettes. GL says when his dad picked up the car, it was originally a 350 small block and that everything the about the ’67 being represented as an L88 is false.

“Well he only got maybe 3 things right in his eBay ad. He did talk to me, it was sold to a William Neeck and it is a 1967 Corvette. Not only was it a 350hp small block car when produced and we picked it up at the factory, but it was also my Fathers Shrine Corvette Patrol parade car. Since my dad was the dealer and also in the patrol he never had to license his Shrine car but rather drove it on a dealer plate. The first true owner would have been Mr. Neeck. There are several photos out there showing the 67 Shrine cars and members standing by their car. I can point out that exact car in the pics. It had a blue interior from the factory. Everything about it being an L88 is a fake. The buyers invoice is fake, I don’t know about the repair order so maybe he got 4 things right. He came to me in the early 90s and wanted me to back his story about the supposed L88. I told him no way. By the way I was 21 in 1967 and between my twin brother and I put several thousand miles on that exact car. As to paperwork no I don’t have the factory invoice but I do have other documentation on that car. I don’t hang out on other Corvette boards but if anybody wants to know the truth, let them know it is a fake. I will be happy to provide the documentation I have and point out a number of errors he has made in his paperwork, but only to someone I trust won’t take that info back to him so he can do a better job next time.”

Gar Anderson, GL’s twin brother also was heard from. Gar had accompanied his father to the St. Louis plant when the cars were picked up in person. He said the documentation pictured in the listing is a fake as well. He said the seller tried to get Gar and his brother to collaborate with him on trying to sell this car as original, but Gar refused.

“The car is a complete fake. It was originally one of the Order of Shriner’s cars. All were white with blue interiors and all were small blocks. The L88 option wasn’t even available until January of 1967. This car was built in October of 1966. GL Anderson is my twin brother, and he and I were very involved with Anderson Auto at the time. The Ebay seller tried to minimize that fact. As a matter of fact, in 1967, my brother and I purchased our grandfather’s Buick, Pontiac and GMC dealership which was located across the street from Anderson Auto. Although we were in college and owned the Buick store, we continued to work at the Chevy store. If we would have sold a real L-88, you’d think we would be helping the seller, not trying to stop him.”

So being Corvette people and not content to just let an apparent fake be sold to an unsuspecting buyer, GL went to eBay and posted an auction that would show up if someone was searching 67 Corvettes and L88′s. The item for sale was a photo showing the Shriner cars being picked up at the St. Louis assembly plant. (See Photo) In the photo GL claims that his Dad is shown standing next to the Corvette in question and has other documents that will prove the Corvette is a fake.

So did the Corvette sell? In the closing minutes of the auction, the bid jumped from $185,000 to $450,000. While speculation was that the seller upped the price to save face, the high bid was placed by another Corvette guy to make a point:

“I bid on it knowing it was fake. Mainly I did it just to cost him some more money or at least the hassle of getting a refund through eBay. I figure if he wants to misrepresent the car then he deserves to have to spend some extra money and/or effort on his advertising. If the seller actually expects me to buy the car he will first have to present evidence which proves the car is not one of the Shriner’s cars. If he can do that then I’ll gladly pay his reserve price.”

What can we learn from a story like this? If you are going to clone a ’67 L88 Corvette, advertise it as such. Otherwise, seller beware! The Corvette community can and will police itself whenever possible.

 

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